Home Page Kalimba Page Orff Instruments Page Marimbas Page Drums,Log Xylophones & Hand Percussion Page Traditional Instruments News Page Sounds Page Resources Page Contact Us!

Drums & Hand Percussion

DRUMS

A Group of Our Drums Our drums are modelled closely on two styles of traditional African drums, the Moropa drum found commonly amongst the Pedi and Shona, and the Ngoma drum from Uganda. We use sustainable commercial pinewood in place of the large trunks of old growth hardwood trees from which traditional drums are hand carved. Our primary concern is sound quality and not tourist curio appeal. The three smaller drums are laminated and turned on our custom built lathe. The larger drums are produced using staves as in coopered barrels. They all have rawhide heads held by hardwood pegs in the traditional way. The smaller drums have a rope carrying handle and can be supplied with stands.




HAND PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS


Claves

Pronounced 'klaa-vehs' in Spanish, meaning 'keys', as the rhythm they play is the key to all Latin American music. Claves consist of two turned rods of tempered Sneezewood, which are played by striking one with the other to produce a click that can be heard over any other sound.

Bass Claves

A lower sounding clave made from hollow turned Kiaat wood, with a Meranti wood beater. The instrument requires a small degree of skill to produce a very satisfying, warm 'thock'.

Tone blocks

With a sound like traditional temple blocks, these instruments have a tempered Sneezewood sounding board on an accurately tuned Kiaat wood sound box. They are easy to play and are supplied with a turned Sneezewood beater.

Shakers

Based on instruments made in Latin America, these shakers are woven for us by a local disabled craftsman from cane, and incorporate a hardboard disk. This is essential to produce two distinct and contrasting sounds, opening up a wealth of rhythmic possibilities to the creative player.

Home Kalimbas Orff Instruments Marimbas Drums Traditional Instruments News Sounds Tools Contact Us


This page © Copyright 2001, Christian Carver